“In the Eyes of the Hungry”: Florida’s Changing Landscape opens March 13 at Orlando City Hall

“In the Eyes of the Hungry”: Florida’s Changing Landscape opens March 13 at Orlando City Hall

City of Orlando Public Art is pleased to announce our next upcoming exhibition at Orlando City Hall’s Terrace Gallery, “In the Eyes of the Hungry”: Florida’s Changing Landscape. “In the Eyes of the Hungry”: Florida’s Changing Landscape

March 13 – April 23 Terrace Gallery at Orlando City Hall

The University of Central Florida, in conjunction with Seminole County Public Library, is a recipient of a grant of $16,000 to host the NEA Big Read in Orlando and Seminole County. A program of the National Endowment for the Arts, the NEA Big Read broadens our understanding of our world, our communities, and ourselves through the joy of sharing a good book. The NEA Big Read in Orlando and Seminole County will focus on John Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939).

Sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts Big Read and inspired by The Grapes of Wrath, In the Eyes of the Hungry: Florida’s Changing Landscape examines Florida’s demographic, geographic, and ecological shifts over the last century. Working in photography, painting, printmaking, quilting, and embroidery,

CITYOFORLANDO.NET/ARTS TERRACE GALLERY

● THE MAYOR’S GALLERY

● GARDEN HOUSE GALLERY AT HARRY P. LEU GARDENS

The selected artists provide immediate yet transcendental responses to Florida’s changing landscape and explore ideas ranging from agriculture and industrialization to migration and tourism to ecology and conservation.

From documentary photographs made for the Farm Security Administration to paintings created at Florida’s artists’ colonies to contemporary work challenging industrialization and immigration, In the Eyes of the Hungry:

Florida’s Changing Landscape explores the diversity of the state and its changing physical, social, and economic landscapes. Whether responses to the Great Depression, agricultural and urban development, ecological degradation, or migrant labor, the collected works offer dynamic and haunting responses to Florida’s unique and changing environment.

—Keri Watson, Ph.D. Curator and Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Central Florida

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